Bound for Zion

I leave tomorrow for a week photographing in Zion National Park, a location I have long been wanting to visit. No, I’ve never been before. So many choices, so little time.

I’ll be traveling with my friend and colleague Daniel Stainer, a very advanced amateur (I consider him a pro and have featured him before in my blog: http://blog.lesterpickerphoto.com/2011/04/25/through-the-eyes-of-daniel-stainer/).

What makes this trip different for me, aside from the location, is that I will be carrying only my new Hasselblad equipment with me. For the first time since 1969 I am using a second camera system. By no means am I giving up my trusty Nikons. That camera system is still a dream with all its advanced technologies and capabilities and it still rules for wildlife imagery and most landscapes.

It’s just that nowadays my clients are requesting larger images for display purposes, which necessitates a much larger sensor and higher pixel count. I tried experimenting with large format film cameras earlier in the year, but my 4x5 Arca Swiss camera, lenses, film and extras were just too heavy and bulky to shlep around comfortably. I stepped up to Hassy just a month ago and so far am most pleased with the results, which I hope to share with you over the next few weeks. Here is one of my first images with the Hassy, taken at a local stream. I used my H4D-50 with a 120mm lens, ISO 50, f32, 2.5 seconds, -0.3 exposure compensation. This is the RAW file, processed as a jpeg for posting here, so it will lose lots of tonality in translation.

As always I’ll blog from on site and you can follow my trails in real time through my SPOT GPS transmitter. Just go to this URL:

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0Wk7XE3FZR8cMOxIXiq3HqV5z7Zdr9mtR

I’ll start going live on Sunday, November 6 when we begin hiking to our photo locations.

Hope you are all enjoying the last bits of Fall. It was a pretty disappointing color show here in the mid-Atlantic, at least compared to other years. Now it’s time to ready equipment and clothing for the winter shooting season.

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